Latest product designs evaluated by the public


Does it live up to your expectations? Does it do what you want it to do? Which aspects of the product should be improved? Say first-hand what you think. Evaluate them with the 4Cliks! Evaluator.






3Doodler printing pen

3Doodler printing pen

The first handheld 3D printer.

3Doodler is a brand new way of creating 3D objects. It uses uses 3mm ABS plastic or PLA bioplastic as its "ink", just like a 3D printer. As you draw with it on any...
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Lytro light field camera

Lytro light field camera

The Camera 3.0

Unlike a conventional camera that captures a single plane of light, Lytro is the first consumer plenoptic camera that lets people instantly capture a...
Read more »
Taga Carrier Bike and Baby Stroller

Taga Bike & Stroller

Fun and functionality.

Taga is a 3-wheel carrier bike that takes only 20 seconds (4 steps) to be transformed into a premium stroller that easily navigates stores, boards...
Read more »



The Solar-Sinter Project

The Solar-Sinter Project

3D Printing will change the world.

In a world increasingly concerned with questions of energy production and raw material shortages, the Solar-Sinter Project explores the potential of desert manufacturing... Read more »
MGX LOTUS Lamp

LOTUS Lamp

3D printing. Arts & tech.

Inspired by the flower of the same name, this delicate and elegant light was first introduced at 100% Design in London in 2003, attracting immediate attention... Read more »
Engelbrechts Plateau lounge chair 2012

Plateau lounge chair

Converging leisure and work.

Plateau fuses table and chair into a world of its own. The name derives from the larger and flat surface of its right armrest, which becomes a table for a laptop...
Read more »



PrintDreams PrintBrush™ 4X6 printer

PrintBrush™ 4X6 printer

No format, no limits.

The PrintBrush 4X6 is an handheld RMPT ink-jet printer, with a built-in digital camera, able to print in colour (600 dpi) directly onto virtually any flat surface, including... Read more »

Ekso Bionic Exoskeleton

Ekso Exoskeleton

For the human endeavor.

Ekso is the first generation of intelligent, bionic exoskeleton that augment strength, endurance and mobility to help people with lower extremity mobility...
Read more »
SWYP (See What You Print) Concept Printer by Artefact Group

SWYP Concept Printer

Next Generation Printer.

The issue with printers is not that we lack the necessary technology, but rather that the core design and usability issues have not been fully addressed, they have... Read more »
Suited! Product Design is a venue open to the exchange of ideas and collaboration between consumers, designers, engineers, sellers and manufacturers worldwide. Several easy-to-use 4Clicks! surveys help evaluate which aspects of the product are the most appreciated by the user and stimulate and open debate in which visitors can freely express their opinions and needs, and propose ways to improve the product.






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GravityLight. Generating light from gravity.


GravityLight-gravity-powered-lamp-development-initiative-Deciwatt
How to do more with less

GravityLight is a gravity-powered lamp designed to provide affordable, sustainable and reliable light that enables people in developing or third-world nations, to break free from the economic, health and environmental negative impacts of kerosene lamps.

Today, over 1.5 billion people - about 21% of the world's population - have no reliable access to mains electricity and it will continue to grow. These people rely instead on biomass fuels - predominantly kerosene - for light.

The World Bank estimates that, as a result, 780 million women and children inhale smoke, which is equivalent to smoking 2 packets of cigarettes every day. 60% of adult, female lung-cancer victims in developing nations are non-smokers. These fumes kill an estimated 1.5 million women and children in Africa every year and, along with the poor quality of light, also causes eye infections and cataracts. But burning kerosene is also more immediately dangerous: in India alone 1.5 million people suffer severe burns each year, primarily due to overturned kerosene lamps.

Fuel burns quickly and is comparatively expensive: in fact burning kerosene for only lighting can consume 10 to 20% of a household's income. This burden traps people in a permanent state of subsistence living, buying cupfuls of fuel for their daily needs, as and when they can.

GravityLight has no batteries, it is completely clean and green. To generate light from gravity, it uses a bag filled with rocks or earth, attached to a belt, which slowly descends (similar to the weight drive in a cuckoo clock) tugging the belt to turn a series of plastic gears that work in unison to spin an electric motor. This motor powers a small yet bright LED that provides continuous illumination for up to 25 minutes. The action only generates a deciwatt or two of power but has a superior light to the majority of kerosene lamps and can be used over and over again with no running costs.

In the final design, control options have been increased and there are now 3 settings, which vary brightness according to ‘drop time’, creating 15, 20 and 25-minute drop rates. The +/- terminals at the front have been removed and replaced with a neat DC socket on the back, onto which different ‘accessories’ can be attached. This provides a much more reliable and simple way of connecting them; for those who prefer the +/- terminal, adaptors are easy to source.

GravityLight prototype production will run at the end of July 2013. London-based product designers Martin Riddiford and Jim Reeves expect to have the first batch produced in late summer and they estimate that, when mass-produced, the target cost for this light will be less than $5.

Manufacturer: Deciwatt, UK **
Design: Martin Riddiford & Jim Reeves
More: www.deciwatt.net/



** Deciwatt is a product development initiative with a mission to explore how to do more with less;
in turn empowering people through sustainable and affordable low power solutions.








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third-world-typical-kerosene-lamp
"Demonstration of a typical kerosene lamp: which usually consists of an old medicine bottle. Filling it involved lots of spillage. Lighting it with a match produced a yellow flame, giving the light equivalent of a candle, and a lot of smoke."
- www.deciwatt.net



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Orbital Magnetic Levitating LED Light


Orbital Magnetic Levitating LED Light design by Margot Krasojevic
    Lamp that floats in air

By Margot Krasojevic

The lamp 3D printed LED diffuser is made from a lightweight ceramic or a semi transparent UV cured acrylic that gives an ethereal glow when switched on.

The light geometry is a symmetrical helix which can be balanced along a central axis depending on which surface you wish to levitate it from, the semi- conducting base creates a magnetic field around it which enables you to position the light hovering over it, when gently pushed it rotates altering it's immediate surroundings.

The light can also be hung like a static ceiling pendant. The LED is positioned within the surface of the light geometry or alternatively underneath the semi-conducting base to allow for free movement and rotation.


Manufacturer: Shapeways / Margot Krasojevic
Design: Margot Krasojevic
Materials: Ceramic and nylon
Dimensions: 170 x 120 mm
PDF Archive: Download
More: www.margotkrasojevic.org
















































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Orbital Magnetic Levitating LED Table-lamp design by Margot Krasojevic



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Agrobot SW 6010 Strawberry Harvester


Agrobot SW6010 Strawberry Harvester
       High-tech farming

Agrobot SW 6010 is a harvester equipped with a set of robotic arms whose movements are managed by an AGB® system that analyzes the fruit one by one and is responsible for ordering the precise cutting movements that guarantee accuracy, smoothness, and delicacy in the strawberry treatment.

This is possible thanks to its optical sensor AGvision ®, an artificial vision system that implement in real time a protocol for morphological and colour analysis to identify and select the fruit based on the size, external quality, and degree of maturation according to the quality standards previously set by the farmer.

The robotic arms ends in a sort of rubber lined basket with thin round plates as razors for removing fruit from pedicel.

Once picked, the strawberries are placed on a conveyor belt and are hygienically moved to the packaging area, consisting of two ergonomic workstations where operators can immediately select and pack the fruit.

The all-wheel drive SW 6010 comes equipped with high efficiency and low fuel consumption motors, Lombardini Diesel 28.5 HP engines, 2-cylinder and 1248 cm3, insulated to reduce noise and vibration.

ATCross is a revolutionary navigation system that integrates a guidance and automatic operation system (AGM), providing fully independent control of the main functions of the harvester. Totally parallel passes on the beds and perfect bed headers manoeuvres.

The chassis is designed to resist the hardest stresses and the access is distributed frontally, avoiding lower rear access control.

The robotic arms are modular and easily replaceable in case of damage or malfunction, causing minimal delay in the progress of harvest.

The SW 6010 prototype was shown to be 50% more cost efficient and the economic advantage of this harvesting method is estimated at 0.20 Eurocents per kilo of picked strawberries.


Manufacturer: Soluciones Robóticas Agrícolas, AGROBOT, Spain
Design: Juan Bravo / Agrobot
Motors: Lombardini Diesel 28.5 HP, 2-cylinder, 1248 cm3
Dimensions: 2,5x 7x 2 m
More: www.agrobot.com/




















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Agrobot in TVE (Spanish TV)


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3Doodler. The 3D printing pen.


3Doodler 3D printing pen by WobbleWorks
    The world’s first handheld 3D printer.

3Doodler is a brand new way of creating 3D objects. The 3D printing pen uses 3mm ABS plastic or PLA bioplastic as its "ink", just like a 3D printer.

As you draw with it on any surface and lift it up into the air, it extrudes heated plastic, which is quickly cooled by an integrated fan, and solidifies into a strong stable structure. This allows users to easily build an infinite variety of 3D shapes and models, jewellery, decorative art, and personalize items such as iPhone cases, laptops, pens, etc. It can even be used for minor repair work.

It’s compact and easy to use, and obviously requires no software or computers. You just plug it into a power socket and can start drawing anything within minutes. You will instantly be able to trace objects on paper, and after only a few hours of practice you will be able to make far more intricate objects.

Designs can be created as flat forms and peeled off a piece of paper, as freestyle 3D objects, or in separate parts, ready to be joined together using the 3Doodler.

3Doodler is actually nearing production; final version is expected to be delivered by January 2014.

3Doodler is on Kickstarter
(a crowdsourced funding platform for creative projects).

Manufacturer: WobbleWorks LLC. USA
Design: Peter Dilworth and Max Bogue
Dimensions: 180 x Ø24 mm
Weight: 200 grams
More: www.the3doodler.com













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3Doodler jewellery and decorative art


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Conoflat shower tray.


Kaldewei Conoflat shower tray
  Freedom and comfort

Product review proposed by JoelK.

The modern bathroom is becoming more homely – which means it now has to fulfil more aesthetic requirements as well as functional ones. In addition to factors such as comfort, safety and sustainability, an attractive and individual design is now also a key design criterion in the bathroom.

The floor-level shower Conoflat offers an extremely flat design, with the result that trip hazards are outdated. The central outflow with the square cover in the same colour as the tray acts as a characteristic design element. It combines elegant aesthetics and unlimited freedom of movement with stability and comfort underfoot.

The shower tray is made of 3.5 mm Kaldewei steel enamel* that, unlike tiled showers, appeals for its continuous durable surface and so is extremely easy to look after.

Conoflat is available in 12 shades to offer room for classic as well as trendy room concepts.

Manufacturer: Kaldewei, Germany
Design by: Sottsass Associati
Materials: steel enamel ** 3,5mm
Dimensions: 800x800 / 1200x1200 / 759x900 / 1000x1600 x H 32 mm
More: www.kaldewei.com/products/


** Californian Borax, Scandinavian quartz, feldspar and soda, Kaldewei uses glass-forming natural materials to produce a special enamel with a surface that is guaranteed to remain durable for at least 30 years. Not even the microscopically tiniest scratches occur on the smooth, glass-hard surface: bacteria don’t have a chance to settle. The unique surface also appeals for its easy-care properties: cleaning takes only moments, and no smears or traces remain when dry.

Kaldewei History:




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Conoflat shower tray colors


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Kaldewei products. Source - BatheAustralia




ADzero. The Bamboo-built Smartphone.


ADzero bamboo-built smartphone
      Natural accent


AD Zero is a stylised Android 4.0 powered smart-phone approximately half the weight of an iPhone, with a larger screen and featuring Ring Flash technology, a ring of LED lights around the camera’s lens to provide even flash distribution when taking photos.

But what really makes it unique is that the phone's casing is sculpted out of a single piece of four-year-old organically grown bamboo that has been treated to make it more durable.

After posting his concept online, the UK student on Middlesex’s Product Design course, Mr Kieron-Scott, was contacted by a Chinese technology entrepreneur wanting to make the phone a reality. It was initially intended for the Chinese market, but after receiving an enthusiastic reception at a design show during London Design Week 2011, the company plan on launching the phone internationally.



 Manufacturer: ADzero, China  /  Design by: Kieron-Scott Woodhouse
 Materials: four-year-old bamboo  /  More: www.justadzero.com


AD Head Designer Kieron-Scott talks about the ADzero process:




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ADzero smartphone details




The Solar-Sinter Project.


Solar-Sinter Project by Markus Kayser
3D Printing will change
the world

In a world increasingly concerned with questions of energy production and raw material shortages, the Solar-Sinter Project explores the potential of desert manufacturing, where two elements dominate - sun and sand. The sun offers a vast energy source of huge potential, the sand an unlimited supply of silica in the form of quartz.

When silica sand is heated to melting point (up to 1.600 ºC / 2.912 ºF) and then cooled, it solidifies as glass. This process of converting a powdery substance via a heating process into a solid form is known as sintering and has in recent years become a central process in design prototyping known as 3D printing or SLS (selective laser sintering). These 3D printers use laser technology to create very precise 3D objects from a variety of powdered plastics, resins and metals.

By using the sun’s rays instead of a laser and sand instead of resins, Markus Kayser - MA in Design Products at Royal College of Arts, London 2011 - designed the Solar-Sinter, an entirely solar-powered machine and production process that could bring together these two raw elements for making glass objects.

The experimental printer uses ReplicatorG software, an open source 3D printing program (see replicat.org) and is fully-automated computer driven. Light sensors track the sun across the sky and the whole device pivots at its base to produce the highest temperatures.

The sand is placed in a bowl beneath the high-powered Fresnel lens, and the solar beam slides back and forth on an east/west axis, melting the sand as it goes. When a layer is complete, a new sprinkling of sand is placed on top, which is then also melted into the previous layer. This continues until an object has been created.

In May 2011, after initial tests in the Moroccan desert, Kayser took the solar-sintering machine to the Sahara desert near Siwa, Egypt, for a two-week testing period.

The results aims to raise questions about the future of manufacturing and triggers dreams of the full utilisation of the production potential of the worlds most efficient energy resource - the sun. Whilst not providing definitive answers, this experiment aims to provide a point of departure for fresh thinking.

Kayser believes that in time, variations of the Solar-Sinter could be used in full-scale architectural projects, creating a whole new desert industry that relies only on sand and sun.

The project is currently on show at the Design Museum’s Designs of the Year 2012 exhibition (08 February – 04 July).

Concept design: Markus Kayser, UK
More: www.markuskayser.com













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3D printer parts of Solar-Sinter Project

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The LOTUS Lamp.


LOTUS MGX lamp
3D printing: Arts & tech

Inspired by the flower of the same name, this delicate and elegant light was first introduced at 100% Design in London in 2003, attracting immediate attention to the revolutionary possibilities of digital manufacturing.

The sophisticated diffuser was created as a single object, without joints, using Stereolithography (SLA) a 3D material printing process (video above) that allows for unlimited design possibilities far beyond the capacity of traditional manufacturing processes.

The lamp is available in eight shades and it is touch-sensitive: the light can be switched on and off, and dimmed, with just the faintest brush of fingertips.

Manufacturer: MGX ( Materialise NV), Belgium
Design by: Janne Kyttanen
Materials: Epoxy, stainless steel
Dimensions: H 150 / 580 / 1430 mm
Shades: Ø 145x 133 / Ø 190x 170 mm
More: www.mgxbymaterialise.com/




Lotus shade creation process:




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LOTUS MGX beautiful 3D printed shades

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Plateau lounge chair, 2012.


Plateau chair 2012 by Engelbrechts
Converging leisure and work

Plateau fuses table and chair into a world of its own. The name derives from the larger and flat surface of its right armrest, which becomes a table for a laptop or a coffee cup and a shell that closes in on you.

This new version changes the base to a four-star base and streamlines the backrest in order to create a lighter and simpler look. The new base is made of highly polished easy-to-clean aluminium and is available with an automatic return swivel or “free rotating”.

The organic form challenges the upholstery work to the extreme, creating new manufacturing processes, which, among other things, have minimized the number of seams.

The lounge chair comes with leather or fabric upholstery.




 Manufacturer: Engelbrechts A/S, Denmark / Design by: Erik Magnussen / Dimensions: 900x 870x 1220 mm
 Materials: Aluminium, hard foam, polyurethane foam, leather or fabric upholstery / More: www.engelbrechts.com/plateau


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Plateau chair details and color


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